Feathers Flights // Sewing Blog

9.21.2017

Me Made: Floral Tania Culottes

Me Made: Floral Tania Culottes
This is the most comfortable and flattering way to wear shorts. I have a chambray version that I wear with all my patterned tees, and this is my fun floral version that I wear with all my solid tees. I made these floral culottes earlier in the summer and wore them weekly, and now I'm finally getting around to blogging about it.
We went on a little family trip this summer, and this floral tania is what I brought with me. It was perfect for traveling. It was comfortable to wear in the car while driving, and it was comfortable for walking around in the heat.
Me Made: Floral Tania Culottes
I used the Tania Culottes pattern just like my chambray culottes. I did the same alterations of adding 1/2" to the rise and 1/2" to the hem. I added side seam pockets, eliminated the zipper, and added an elastic waist back. I shared the tutorial for this on Megan Nielsen's Design Diary. The elastic back version is so comfortable and easy to wear when it's hot.
Me Made: Floral Tania Culottes
I used a floral rayon challis from Fabric.com* that I bought about a year go. I bought it at the same time as this striped rayon challis. Those two rayon challis fabrics feel very different from each other. The striped rayon is very drapey and very fluid. The floral rayon feels more like a lawn or really light quilting cotton. This rayon challis was easier to use than any other rayon challis I've used. It wasn't slippery at all. When I let the chambray version hang the bias stretched out a ton. When I let this floral version hang the bias didn't stretch out at all. I hemmed it without trimming edges off.
Me Made: Floral Tania Culottes

9.19.2017

Sewing for Kindergarten: A Boy's Capsule Wardrobe

Sewing for Kindergarten: A Boy's Capsule Wardrobe
In past years I've watched other sewing bloggers sew outfits for their kindergartener starting school and thought it would take forever until my oldest would go to kindergarten. But this year is the year! My oldest started kindergarten and I got to plan his first day of school outfit. This year Sewing for Kindergarten is hosted by A Jennuine Life, so you can go see all the other great kindergarten outfits!
When school starts in August here, it's hot  and summery, but after about a month it cools down for Fall. I made a summery first day of school outfit, but for the past six months I've been thrifting my son's "capsule" wardrobe so I wouldn't be scrambling when the weather turned cold.
Sewing for Kindergarten: A Boy's Capsule Wardrobe
I decided to make a shark tee for my son to give him some extra courage. I like to think my kids get strength by being wrapped up in handmade love. They know I care about them because they are wearing something I made them.
I upcycled three adult tees to make this tee. I would've used one tee to upcycle, but I was trying to use up some pieces of tees that I had. I used a navy blue tee for the back and reused the hem, I used a white tee for the front and reused the hem, and I used a blue striped tee for the neckline and sleeves and reused the hems. I used the top from the Alex & Anna PJs* because I had it traced and ready. I just did short sleeves. I did a size 5 with a little extra length.
I found a shark picture online that I altered and cut out with my cricut*. I used this royal blue iron on* because it was the closest blue to the blue on the shirt.
For the shorts I drafted the pattern myself from some of my son's other shorts. I used a gray sweatshirt fabric that I had in my stash. I added a pale blue drawstring to the waistband and a twin needle line of stitching around the hem.
After wearing these items a couple times a week for the past couple of weeks, they have some dirt and stains. I used to be bothered by seeing a lot of wear, but now it makes me happy to see them use up and wear out their clothes.Sewing for Kindergarten: A Boy's Capsule Wardrobe
I wanted to make a capsule wardrobe for my son so that it's easier for him to dress, easier to thrift ahead of time, and less laundry for me to do. I used this free kids capsule printable to help me get started. I love the free printable and that helps the most with thrifting a size up. It helps me remember what I already have so I don't buy too much of one item. 
Short Sleeved Tees - I shortened the sleeves of the space tee and the bear tee. I added iron on to the green and made the shark tee. I thrifted the striped tee and bought the Old Navy tee on sale.
Sewing for Kindergarten: A Boy's Capsule Wardrobe
Shorts -  I thrifted the blue shorts. I thrifted the orange pants and then cut them to shorts. I made the black pants and then cut them to shorts. I made the gray sweatshirt shorts. I made the gray pants and then cut them to shorts. I thrifted the blue sweatshirt shorts.
Sewing for Kindergarten: A Boy's Capsule Wardrobe
Long Sleeve Tees - I made the red and blue striped sweatshirt. I thrifted the eagle tee, the green striped tee, the two batman tees, the striped pocket tee, and the gray tee.
Sewing for Kindergarten: A Boy's Capsule Wardrobe
Pants - I bought the Old Navy jeans last spring. I thrifted the gray pants. I thrifted the three Levi pants.
Sewing for Kindergarten: A Boy's Capsule Wardrobe
Don't forget to see everyone else's cool makes for Kindergarten!
Sewing for Kindergarten: A Boy's Capsule Wardrobe

9.18.2017

Me Made: Navy Pencil Skirt + Giveaway

Me Made: Navy Pencil Skirt + Giveaway
I have something to confess: I made this skirt almost one year ago. I needed a basic knit skirt and the ladies from Simple Simon and Co were testing this pattern. I love having a little incentive for something I need. I love the ease of making it and the ease of wearing it. It might be a little boring in blogland to make a navy solid pencil skirt, because it isn't interesting or patterned, but since making this skirt I've worn it at least once a month. I also took it on a 10-day trip where I needed to wear a skirt/dress three times, and I only had to take this one skirt. I was able to switch out my tops and cardigans to have different outfits. I love this skirt!
Me Made: Navy Pencil Skirt + Giveaway
This is the Knit Pencil Skirt Pattern PDF Pattern. It's been so long ago that I can't remember what size I made! I didn't have any fitting issues though. The knit makes it really forgiving with fit. The pattern is two pattern pieces, a knit hem, and an elastic waistband.
The changes I made were to cut out four skirt pieces instead of two. I'm a little uncomfortable with only one layer of cotton spandex as a skirt or pants, so I did an extra layer. I basically lined the skirt with the same navy cotton spandex to give me extra coverage. This means that all my seams were enclosed, and then I did the hem and elastic.
Me Made: Navy Pencil Skirt + Giveaway
I used a basic navy cotton spandex that I got as a remnant from a manufacturer. I love this fabric, but here is a similar navy jersey* and navy jersey. Cotton spandex is one of my favorite fabrics to work with. It's easy to use and stretchy but stable. You can also win two yards of Riley Blake knit fabric from Simple Simon and Co if you comment on their post!
Me Made: Navy Pencil Skirt + Giveaway

9.12.2017

Me Made: Bamboo Rayon Harbor Knot Tee

Me Made: Bamboo Rayon Harbor Knot Tee
Even though I have plans to make one more summer garment, I've already planned out my Fall wardrobe and finished my first piece this weekend. I wanted to start by making some weather transitional tops. Items that are warmer than my regular tees and that'll work nicely with warm layers. I started with a half sleeve knotted tee made from a gorgeous bamboo rayon spandex.
Me Made: Bamboo Rayon Harbor Knot Tee
I've made the Harbor Knot Tee three times now, here are the dotted first and floral second. Since I've made it multiple times I had the original alterations, and then altered it slightly for this version. The original alterations were shorten the curve by 2". I added waist shaping and lengthened the bodice by 1". 
I kept those alterations and then I lengthened the sleeves, took in the sides some more, and shortened the hem another 1". I'm happy with this tee, but I still feel like the pattern needs tweaking. It's too loose above the knot and too tight below the knot.
Me Made: Bamboo Rayon Harbor Knot Tee
I really, really love working with bamboo rayon spandex. I've used bamboo rayon spandex from fabric.com* and I've used bamboo rayon spandex from Michael Levine*. I decided to try bamboo rayon spandex from Harts Fabric this time. This fabric feels slightly different that all the other bamboos I've worked with; it still has a nice drape, but it's a thicker hand than anything else I've worked with. It's as easy to work with as a high quality cotton spandex, but it drapes like rayon. It's a really pretty fabric, and this knotted tee was the perfect way to use the fabric.
I didn't have any trouble with this fabric, and it was a dream to sew. It has such a nice hand and drape and return. I just love working with bamboo rayon spandex. I've also found that it lasts a really long time. All my bamboo items I've made it the past are still going strong in my wardrobe and don't look worn out, but most of my cotton spandex or rayon spandex items don't last that long and have to be retired. I love finding a fabric that can hold up to lots of wear and washing.
Me Made: Bamboo Rayon Harbor Knot Tee
Again I used the Heat n Bond Soft Stretch* for my hems and it makes my hems look so good and keep the stretch. I hemmed the top and after finishing it and putting it on, I realized the length was bad and needed to be shorter. I didn't want to mess with the knot so I just hemmed the curve. I took out the stitches started 3" away from the knot and cut off the hem. I made sure the curve looked nice before using more Soft Stretch* to rehem it. I'm glad I hemmed it shorter even though I didn't appreciate the extra work because I'm much happier with the result which means I'm more likely going to wear it often. As much as I hate redoing things, I've found it's almost always worth it so that I'll actually wear the item.
Me Made: Bamboo Rayon Harbor Knot Tee
I only ordered a yard of the fabric and this pattern calls for 1 yard for the short sleeve version. I had to be really careful and strategic when cutting it out to make it work. Unfortunately, I cut the small curved piece with the wrong side out. I didn't have any fabric to recut it, so it's just backwards. Luckily, you can't tell because of the color and type of fabric.
This tee is definitely mom and baby approved! I love that it's easy and simple and a great basic, but it looks put together with the knot detail. I can see myself wearing this tee a lot all winter.
Me Made: Bamboo Rayon Harbor Knot Tee

9.08.2017

Me Made: Striped Rayon Willamette + Using Fabric as Interfacing

Me Made: Striped Rayon Willamette + Using Fabric as Interfacing
I have so much to say about this shirt and this fabric. It shows my indecisiveness when it comes to fabric I really, really love. Or maybe it shows the benefit of waiting a long time before using fabric.
I bought this rayon challis fabric two or three years ago. I saw it on fabric.com* and fell in love with it immediately. I didn't have plans for it and didn't really need it, but I loved it. I remember watching it and looking at it daily for awhile because I wanted it so badly. I was so nervous it would sell out, and I knew I would regret it if I didn't buy it. I bought three yards of it not knowing what I would do with it. I rarely do this; I almost always buy fabric with a plan and use it fairly quickly after buying.
Me Made: Striped Rayon Willamette + Using Fabric as Interfacing
Anyway, I kept it in my stash for awhile. I almost made it into a wrap dress once and changed my mind. Then I fell in love with the Cheyenne tunic* and planned on making a Cheyenne out of this fabric and combining the fabric. The Willamette Shirt* came out and I wasn't too drawn to it at first. As the Cheyenne kept getting put off I realized, the Cheyenne is long sleeves and is a great wintery pattern. And this fabric is very, very summery. I didn't think this fabric would hold up as a winter Cheyenne. I think there'd be too much stress on the fabric in some areas. And then I realized the Willamette* is very similar to the Cheyenne in style it's just basically the summer version. After I figured that out I bought the pattern and had it cut and sewn in less than a month. Sometimes I just really need a good thought process before using coveted fabric.
Me Made: Striped Rayon Willamette + Using Fabric as Interfacing
The Willamette Shirt* is a dolman sleeve loose fitting top. I knew that going into it, and I knew the rayon challis would drape perfectly with this pattern. I was in between a size small and extra small and sized down to a extra small. I also added one inch to the body. I do wish I would've added one more inch for comfort, but it still hits me in a flattering spot.
Me Made: Striped Rayon Willamette + Using Fabric as Interfacing
Isn't that stripe matching amazing!? And that pocket blends in so well.
I chose to do view A which is really straightforward. I wanted the least amount of lines to cut up the pretty fabric print. I also omitted the button and just sewed the placket up slightly higher so I wouldn't have to sew on a button. I'm lazy like that.
I was super careful when matching stripes when I was cutting out the pattern pieces, but somehow the sides were slightly off. Instead cutting off the longer back to make it match the front, I just added short slits to the sides so you can't tell that the lengths are different. This also meant that I couldn't do french seams on the sides so I did clean finish sides instead. Everything else inside the shirt is enclosed except for the front facing.
Me Made: Striped Rayon Willamette + Using Fabric as Interfacing
I really loved the construction of the Willamette*. It reminded me of putting together a jacket. It's a really brilliant construction, but you really need to follow the instructions to make sure everything lines up in the right place. I did a lot of pinning to make sure my stripes lined up.
Me Made: Striped Rayon Willamette + Using Fabric as Interfacing
A little bit ago I poste about tips for saving money while sewing. One thing I've been doing lately is to use fabric as interfacing. I'll go into a little more detail now. It doesn't work for thick fabrics because you need stiff, thin interfacing to give structure and support to those fabrics (like coats and jeans).
I use it for really drapey fabrics and it works very well. I don't like the idea of non-drapey interfacing ruining the gorgeous drape of a lightweight fabric. I don't think that lightweight interfacing is drapey enough. I was really glad I used the same rayon challis for this top so I get a really breezy look.
Basically I just cut out extra pieces that need to be interfaced. I was careful about stripe matching for my front facing so I cut the interfacing on the opposite grain so I knew exactly which was which.
Instead of fusing my interfacing I sew it in. It takes longer, but I don't mind because I get the look I'm going for.
Me Made: Striped Rayon Willamette + Using Fabric as Interfacing
I found with fabrics that are slightly transparent you have to be careful about which way you place the print. You can see in some of my pictures above that the print of the interfacing shows through on my collar. I faced the print the wrong way and should have faced it away from the right side of the collar.
Me Made: Striped Rayon Willamette + Using Fabric as Interfacing
Have you ever had a fabric that took you a long time to cut into and then the end result was better than what you originally planned it to be?
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